Salisbury

Putting on Panto to pay for the Pinter: Henry Marshall Pantomimes at Salisbury Playhouse, 1955 to 1985, by Chris Abbott. Foreword by Stephanie Cole.

Hilarious and sometimes moving account of a fondly-remembered thirty-year run of pantomimes, drawn from interviews with performers, and including a complete transcript of Henry Marshall’s gagbook, a unique pantomime survival. November 2012, 316 pages, illustrated, paperback, £14.95, ISBN 978-1-906978-26-6.

In the Shadow of Salisbury Spire: Recollections of Salisbury Cathedral Choristers and their School (1826-1950), edited by Peter L Smith.

This book of memories spans 125 years in the lives of choristers and others closely involved in the music of Salisbury Cathedral. Recalled are not only daily life in the cathedral and school, but also events that made life rather more exciting. Stories abound of the bishop tobogganing on Harnham Hill; hair-raising Guy Fawkes’ Night fireworks mayhem in Salisbury market place; ferrying a piano precariously up the river on a wooden punt; and ghostly apparitions in the boarding house. These, together with the more serene moments of life spent in close contact with that glorious cathedral; or astute and sometimes acerbic observations on the eccentricities of teachers and clergy alike; or meeting great musicians or composers in the daily round of prayer and music; all have been collected and presented by the school’s honorary archivist. June 2011, 356 pages, illustrations, £14.95. ISBN 978-1-906978-17-4.

If I Did it, I Don’t Remember: Salisbury’s Edwardian Murder Mystery, by Jeremy B Moody and Bruce S Purvis.

Salisbury, October 31st 1908. This date heralded Salisbury’s most infamous murder case, unsolved to this day. A young boy lay dead, his mother was arrested for the murder, and Scotland Yard was brought in to help investigate. Enter Chief Inspector Dew, who had hunted Jack the Ripper, and two years later would arrest the notorious Dr Crippen to gain worldwide fame – Scotland Yard’s first international superstar! The authors have spent three years researching this case, which attracted international media attention for many months a century ago. Their meticulously documented account includes previously unidentified scene of crime photographs, the personal thoughts of Chief Inspector Dew and fascinating new evidence. October 2008, 264 pages, maps and contemporary illustrations, paperback, £12.95, ISBN 978-0-946418-78-7.

Milford, by Richard Durman.

This is the first in a planned series of small books, Sarum Studies, which will describe suburbs and areas of Salisbury, produced under the aegis of the Sarum Chronicle editorial panel. Milford lies on the eastern side of Salisbury, and now consists largely of Victorian and later suburbs. But it has an interesting if somewhat enigmatic history, stretching back to the period before the city of Salisbury was established. Richard Durman, an expert on architectural history who lives in Milford, has provided a readable and informative history which is sure to fascinate residents and everyone who knows and loves Salisbury. 240 x 170mm, 72pp, ills, paperback. 978-0-946418-60-2, £5.95, October 2007

Harnham Mill, by Michael Cowan (Sarum Studies 2).

Harnham Mill is one of Salisbury’s best-known landmarks. Built some five centuries ago as a paper mill, it occupies the site of a medieval fulling mill, and it has in turn been used for making cloth, bone fertilizer and candles. Since the 1930s it has been a hotel and restaurant. This comprehensive account describes not only the building and its evolution, but also the industrial processes and their context within the history of the Salisbury area. March 2008, 52 pages, fully illustrated with photographs and diagrams, paperback, £4.95, ISBN 978-0-946418-67-1.

The Harnham Water Meadows, by Hadrian Cook, Michael Cowan and Tim Tatton-Brown (Sarum Studies 3).

Watermeadows are a fascinating part of England’s landscape heritage. Located at the heart of Salisbury, the Harnham Water Meadows today provide a range of natural habitats. Like watermeadows elsewhere, they are a complicated system for sustainable grassland production that played a major role in the economic development of Wessex. This work presents an account of the history and archaeology of the world famous Harnham system that affords the famous view of Salisbury Cathedral. Hadrian Cook is a hydrologist and soil scientist and an expert on watermeadows. Michael Cowan and Tim Tatton-Brown contribute their knowledge about Harnham and Fisherton Mills respectively. September 2008, 44 pages, illustrated (some colour), paperback, £5.95, ISBN 978-0-946418-67-1.

Endless Street: a History of Salisbury and its People, by John Chandler

Classic social history of one of southern England’s most attractive and historically important cities, first published in 1983, and in and out of print ever since. This is the first time in paperback, reprint of the 1987 edition. November 2010, 229 x 152mm, x, 342 pages + 48 pages of illustrations, paperback, £12.95, ISBN 978-1-906978-23-5

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